City Gardens

Coming in the Winter 2018 issue of Pacific Horticulture

Narrowleaf milkweed (Asclepias fasicularis) growing in a nature park in South Pasadena. Photo: Barbara Eisenstein

Narrowleaf milkweed (Asclepias fasicularis) growing in a nature park in South Pasadena. Photo: Barbara Eisenstein

“Like people everywhere, and perhaps more than most, city dwellers want and need gardens and growing things.”

– Lynden B. Miller

From the Editor,

Every time I claim that my garden will be the end of me I cringe. Our 60- by 130-foot city lot—and there’s a house on it—isn’t large by any measure. That is until the beds need weeding and mulching, the pleached crabapple hedge needs pruning (again), and tired summer plantings need to be cleared away to make room for fresh crops.

Don’t get me wrong— my garden life isn’t all work and no play. Hardly! From providing armfuls of cut flowers for our daughter’s recent wedding to a cozy shelter and fire pit where we host our annual winter Solstice bonfire, this tiny city plot anchors my days.


Win2018_nwsltr_cvr_SEven the smallest garden plot lives much larger than its physical footprint. The upcoming Winter 2018 issue of Pacific Horticulture explores urban gardens and green space in our cities.

  • The Gottlieb Native Garden in Beverly Hills
  • Urban Habitat Parks
  • Sacramento’s Growing Urban Ag Movement
  • Northwest Flower & Garden Show, 30 years
  • The Curious Plantsman looks at Broadleaf Ferns
  • Through the Lens: San Diego Botanical Garden
  • The Working Gardener: Ruth Bancroft Garden
  • City Trees
  •  – and more

Watch for your copy of the Winter 2018 issue of Pacific Horticulture to arrive in early January. Not yet a Pacific Horticulture Society member? Join today and never miss an issue.