Sedum Care and Propagation

By: Erle Nickel
Erle Nickel
http://www.normsnursery.blogspot.com

ERLE NICKEL is an Oakland-based horticulturist, writer, and photographer. He writes a weekly column for the San Francisco Chronicle profiling…

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Sedum nussbaumerianum (front center) in a garden composition. Photo: Luen Miller, Monterey Bay Nursery

Sedum nussbaumerianum (front center) in a garden composition. Photo: Luen Miller, Monterey Bay Nursery

Sedums are easy to care for!

Fast draining soil is the most important condition to provide; half soil and half pumice or sand is a good mix.

Most sedums require full sun, although groundcovers and cascading types will tolerate some shade.

Make sure to let plants thoroughly dry out between waterings, erring on the dry side.

Prune as necessary to shape the planting. Make sure to note if the species is deciduous, so as to not assume the plant has died once it goes dormant.

Sedum nussbaumerianum  Photo: Luen Miller, Monterey Bay Nursery

Sedum nussbaumerianum Photo: Luen Miller, Monterey Bay Nursery

Propagation

Sedums are also one of the easiest plants to propagate. It’s not even necessary to use a rooting hormone.

Take 3- to 4-inch tip cuttings of three or more leaves.

Remove the lower two leaves and insert the sections into a moistened soil mix of half potting soil and half sand. Position exposed nodes (where leaves were removed) beneath the soil surface where they will form new roots.

Set the cuttings in a shady place and water enough to keep the cuttings from drying out.

Allow three weeks for roots to form. Gently tug on cutting—if you feel resistance, the cutting is rotted and ready to pot on.