2018 Festival of Fruit

California Rare Fruit Growers, Santa Clara Valley Chapter

Cherimoya, or custard apple, (Annona cherimola) is native to southern Ecuador and northern Peru. Photo: Hannes Grobe via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5)

Cherimoya, or custard apple, (Annona cherimola) is native to southern Ecuador and northern Peru. Photo: Hannes Grobe via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5)

Today Santa Clara Valley is known for being part of Silicon Valley, but 60 years ago when it was known as the Valley of Heart’s Delight, this area was the world’s largest fruit production and packing region.

Founded in 1968, California Rare Fruit Growers, Inc. (CRFG) is the largest amateur fruit-growing organization in the world. The organization specializes in cultivating and raising awareness of fruits that are not native to nor grown commercially in California and other nearby states. The knowledge and experience of CRFG’s more than 3,000 members contribute to the organization’s resources on the environmentally sound culture of edible plants, including unusual fruits and vegetables, cereals, and seasoning plants. Each year, CRFG produces two main events; scion exchanges in January and February when dormant fruit tree wood is traded for grafting and/or cultivating cuttings, and the Festival of Fruit.

This year’s Festival of Fruit on July 28 celebrates 50 years of growing rare fruit in California and other western states. During the festival you will have the opportunity to listen to lectures by prominent orchardists and expert growers of exotic fruit and vegetables, as well as peruse 40 vendors, including specialty nurseries selling plants, seeds and garden supplies, and specialty artists.

CRFG-Logo2018 Festival of Fruit

July 28, 2018

Campbell Community Center, Campbell, California

Sponsored by the California
Rare Fruit Growers,
Santa Clara Valley Chapter

www.festivaloffruit.org

Both the flowers and fruit of feijoa or pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana) are edible. Photo: Grendelkhan via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Both the flowers and fruit of feijoa or pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana) are edible. Photo: Grendelkhan via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)