Public Gardens

Take a look inside the fall 2018 issue

What we know, we come to care for.

In addition to providing beauty and a place to gather with friends and family and connect with nature, public gardens and stewardship organizations offer a broader perspective and valuable insight into the world beyond our personal gardens.

Feature highlights of the fall issue include:

The hard working plant propagation area at Regional Parks Botanic Garden, where seedlings and cuttings are carefully tended. Photo: Stephanie Penn

The hard working plant propagation area at Regional Parks Botanic Garden, where seedlings and cuttings are carefully tended. Photo: Stephanie Penn

The task of growing and conserving California native plants from throughout the state and the California Floristic Province is no small undertaking. Contributor Stephanie Penn chats with working gardeners at Regional Parks Botanic Garden about their work—in the garden and in the wild.

Footpaths and trails through the Moss Garden allow visitors to immerse themselves in natural beauty. Photo: courtesy of Bloedel Reserve

Footpaths and trails through the Moss Garden allow visitors to immerse themselves in natural beauty. Photo: courtesy of Bloedel Reserve

Public landscapes, natural areas, and generously shared private gardens, nurture our wellbeing and strengthen our communities. A concept that is beautifully expressed in our story about a nature-based program designed to enhance health and healing at the Bloedel Reserve in western Washington.

Magic volunteers work a bucket brigade from a tank truck into the field to water young trees. Photo: courtesy of Magi

Magic volunteers work a bucket brigade from a tank truck into the field to water young trees. Photo: courtesy of Magic

A dedicated group of environmental stewards are tending hearts and minds, along with trees and native plantings on Stanford land, looking to “…secure a future in which we, our gardens, and subsequent generations of both, flourish.”

This is a typical acorn donation, just after the package is opened. (These are from a coast live oak.) Photo: Kathy Morrison

This is a typical acorn donation, just after the package is opened. (These are from a coast live oak.) Photo: Kathy Morrison

“Re-oak Wine County,” an except of a story that first appeared in Flora, a publication of the California Native Plant Society, recounts how Californians answered the call to save acorns for oak restoration in fire-damaged regions.


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