Pat Rubin

Pat Rubin lives in Auburn, California. She writes about gardening for The Sacramento Bee, and has also written for Fine Gardening, Family Circle, San Francisco Chronicle, California Journal, and more. She is especially interested in mediterranean-type  plants, but is also working to collect every kniphofia she can find.


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Debra Prinzing

http://www.debraprinzing.com

Debra Prinzing is the author of six books including The 50 Mile Bouquet: Local, Seasonal and Sustainable Flowers (St. Lynn’s Press, April 2012), created with Seattle photographer David Perry. Her feature stories on architecture and design appear regularly in the Los Angeles Times’ Home section. Debra’s new book, a solo project called slow flowers: Four Seasons of Locally Grown Bouquets from the Garden, Meadow and Farm, also from St. Lynn’s Press, will be published in February 2013. www.debraprinzing.com.


Judith Taylor

Judith M Taylor, a retired Oxford-trained neurologist, now practices history without a license in San Francisco. She has published several books, most recently The Global Migrations of Ornamental Plants: How the World Got into Your Garden (2009). The begonia story is part of a future book on plant breeders and their obsessions.


Lee Neff

Lee Neff is a garden writer and occasional contributor to Pacific Horticulture. She lives and gardens in Kingston, Washington, where she is active with the Flotsam and Jetsam Garden Club and the Northwest Horticultural Society. Her husband John M Neff, MD, is director of the Center for Children with Special Needs at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Both Lee and John have been enthusiastic supporters of the Seattle Children’s PlayGarden.


Richard G Turner Jr

Richard G Turner Jr is the editor emeritus of Pacific Horticulture. After receiving degrees in architecture and landscape architecture from the University of Michigan more than thirty years ago, he escaped to California, where he has worked in the fields of garden design, public garden education and administration, and garden publishing. His small, chemical-free San Francisco garden provides habitat for wildlife while serving as a test ground for mediterranean-climate plants.